82%
82% Success Rate Among Graduates – 82

In February of 2014, The Liberty Ranch staff spoke with all 62 men and women who had completed the long-term graduate program. Our purpose was to collect data and determine the success rates of those who had done so. The following are the results that we found:

The Study

The following percentages represent graduates that remained clean and sober for a year or more after leaving the facility.

• Male Graduates: 82% success rate. 28 of 34 male graduates remain sober.
• Female Graduates: 81% success rate. 17 of 21 female graduates remain sober.
• Combined Male and Female Graduates: 82% success rates. 45 of 55 male and female graduates remain sober.

Out of the 10 graduates that relapsed, seven (7) did so within a year after leaving the facility. While not statistically significant, it directionally reinforces the notion that the first year is the most difficult and turbulent. It’s also worth noting that those who relapsed did not follow the criteria set forth in their exit/aftercare plans. Men and women graduates who followed through with the criteria in their exit/aftercare plans are the ones who remained clean and sober.

After 2 Years

• Male Graduates: 97% success rate. Those who reached 2 or more years of sobriety are still clean and sober today. 1 of 34 male graduates relapsed after the 2 year mark.
• Female Graduates: 90% success rate. Those who reached 2 or more years of sobriety are still clean and sober today. 2 of 21 female graduates relapsed after the 2 year mark.
• Combined Male and Female Graduates: 95% success rate. Those who have reached 2 or more years of continuous sobriety outside the facility are still clean and sober today. Only 3 of 55 male and female graduates relapsed.

Data for Study

All data collected spans the first 8 years of the Liberty Ranch in Kentucky.

Key Definitions

We define our graduate success rate on the following standard: People who have not relapsed, and have maintained multiple years of sobriety. This is an important differentiator as many hospital based programs and residential treatment centers define their success after only a few weeks or months of sobriety and some consider completion of the 30 day program itself a success. Success rates in the short-term are completely unpredictable and almost impossible to collect due to a number of different factors: the number of people in and out of 30-90 day treatment centers is astronomical, most people do not answer the phone call when contacted, and even if they did, how would anyone know for certain if the answers they gave are truthful?